GAME O1 - woMEN

final

Nov 22

Notre dame

81

Gonzaga

65

GAME O2 - WOMEN

final

NOV 22

rutgers

59

Drake

69

GAME O3 - WOMEN

FINAL

NOV 22

south carolina

101

etsu

55

GAME O4 - WOMEN

final

NOV 22

Oregon State

74

western kentucky

60

GAME O5 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

Gonzaga

57

rutgers

40

GAME O6 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

ETSu

67

LOSER GAME 4

82

GAME O7 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

Notre Dame

82

Drake

64

GAME O8 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

South Carolina

68

oregon state

70

GAME O9 - WOMEN

final

NOV 24

rutgers

68

etsu

44

GAME 10 - WOMEN

final

NOV 24

wku

55

gonzaga

76

GAME 11 - WOMEN

final - Championship

NOV 24

notre dame

91

oregon state

81

Final - women

final(OT) - 3rd/4th

NOV 24

drake

90

south carolina

85

Game o1 - Men

Final

Nov 18

washington

82

Santa Clara

68

GAME O2 - MEN

final

NOV 18

Texas A&M

64

Minnesota

69

GAME O3 - MEN

FINAL

NOV 20

MINNESOTA

80

Santa Clara

66

GAME O4 - MEN

8:30PM

NOV 20

washington

71

TEXAS A&M

67

GAME O5 - MEN

3:30PM

NOV 21

Minnesota

68

Washington

66

Events

Vancouver youth look to defend gold on home court at Junior All-Native Basketball Tournament

GAME O1 - woMEN

final

Nov 22

Notre dame

81

Gonzaga

65

GAME O2 - WOMEN

final

NOV 22

rutgers

59

Drake

69

GAME O3 - WOMEN

FINAL

NOV 22

south carolina

101

etsu

55

GAME O4 - WOMEN

final

NOV 22

Oregon State

74

western kentucky

60

GAME O5 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

Gonzaga

57

rutgers

40

GAME O6 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

ETSu

67

LOSER GAME 4

82

GAME O7 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

Notre Dame

82

Drake

64

GAME O8 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

South Carolina

68

oregon state

70

GAME O9 - WOMEN

final

NOV 24

rutgers

68

etsu

44

GAME 10 - WOMEN

final

NOV 24

wku

55

gonzaga

76

GAME 11 - WOMEN

final - Championship

NOV 24

notre dame

91

oregon state

81

Final - women

final(OT) - 3rd/4th

NOV 24

drake

90

south carolina

85

Game o1 - Men

Final

Nov 18

washington

82

Santa Clara

68

GAME O2 - MEN

final

NOV 18

Texas A&M

64

Minnesota

69

GAME O3 - MEN

FINAL

NOV 20

MINNESOTA

80

Santa Clara

66

GAME O4 - MEN

8:30PM

NOV 20

washington

71

TEXAS A&M

67

GAME O5 - MEN

3:30PM

NOV 21

Minnesota

68

Washington

66

Events

Vancouver youth look to defend gold on home court at Junior All-Native Basketball Tournament

Events

Vancouver youth look to defend gold on home court at Junior All-Native Basketball Tournament

More than 800 B.C. youth are preparing for the province's largest youth basketball tournament and no one feels the pressure more than the 10 Vancouver boys who won the title last year.

The Vancity Sons are defending champions of the Junior All-Native Basketball Tournament. Vancouver is hosting this year's championships, which run March 18 to 23, culminating in a championship match at Capilano University. Organizers are expecting more than 5,000 spectators.

It’s an even bigger tournament than the B.C. high school provincials, which had about 60 teams competing this year.

“We are preparing for the crowd,” said 17-year-old Marlon Edgar, a shooting guard for the Vancity Sons.

“It gets pretty wild.

Coach Chris McKnight talks with the team during practice. Photo: Jennifer Gauthier

Edgar, a member of the Nuxalk First Nation, is one of hundreds of athletes who will compete for the title. Edgar moved from Bella Coola to Vancouver when he was in grade 10, specifically for the chance to play basketball at an elite level.

But the Vancity Sons were not always the powerhouse they are today. Kobe McKnight, also a shooting guard, was named MVP at last year’s championships. He recalled the team's humble beginnings in elementary school.

“We weren’t very good. We lost a lot of the games we played in,” said the Kitasoo First Nations member.  

Then, two years ago, they placed 5th at the Junior All-Native.

Last year, they won.

‍Marlon Edgar-Apps sits with teammates during a practice at Britannia Secondary School. Photo: Jennifer Gauthier

The boys are practicing every day this week to prepare for the competition. That level of dedication doesn't surprise coach Chris McKnight, who is also Kobe's father. Many of them grew up dreaming of playing in this very tournament, he said.

“They view this event as very special because they get to play in front of their family, their friends, and the audience is going to be some of the biggest crowds they have ever played in front of.”

McKnight, Edgar, and three teammates just finished the high school basketball season, placing 6th in Double A provincials with the Britannia Bruins.

For McKnight and Edgar, it’s their last year playing at Junior All-Native, which starts at U13 and caps at U17.

“This is our last year to get it done,” said McKnight, who was recently accepted to play college basketball at Douglas College in the fall.

Kobe McKnight, a shooting guard with the Vancity Sons, practices at Britannia Secondary School. Photo: Jennifer Gauthier

But next week’s 83-team tournament is about more than just basketball – culture has always played a big role, according to organizers.

The tournament’s theme this year is unity, with the aim of promoting reconciliation throughout the province as well as within First Nations communities. There is a cultural opening ceremony as well as a family night, where community leaders offer words of encouragement to the players and invite them to dance.

It’s an opportunity for urban indigenous youth to explore their culture more, said McKnight’s father and Vancity Sons coach, Chris McKnight.

“A lot of the kids in urban areas like [Vancouver], they’re not exposed to their culture enough. So a lot of the elders will get them together to sing and dance to expose them to their culture.”

For Edgar, who grew up immersed in that culture, it’s a nostalgic experience.

“It’s a taste of home,” he said.

More than 800 B.C. youth are preparing for the province's largest youth basketball tournament and no one feels the pressure more than the 10 Vancouver boys who won the title last year.

The Vancity Sons are defending champions of the Junior All-Native Basketball Tournament. Vancouver is hosting this year's championships, which run March 18 to 23, culminating in a championship match at Capilano University. Organizers are expecting more than 5,000 spectators.

It’s an even bigger tournament than the B.C. high school provincials, which had about 60 teams competing this year.

“We are preparing for the crowd,” said 17-year-old Marlon Edgar, a shooting guard for the Vancity Sons.

“It gets pretty wild.

Coach Chris McKnight talks with the team during practice. Photo: Jennifer Gauthier

Edgar, a member of the Nuxalk First Nation, is one of hundreds of athletes who will compete for the title. Edgar moved from Bella Coola to Vancouver when he was in grade 10, specifically for the chance to play basketball at an elite level.

But the Vancity Sons were not always the powerhouse they are today. Kobe McKnight, also a shooting guard, was named MVP at last year’s championships. He recalled the team's humble beginnings in elementary school.

“We weren’t very good. We lost a lot of the games we played in,” said the Kitasoo First Nations member.  

Then, two years ago, they placed 5th at the Junior All-Native.

Last year, they won.

‍Marlon Edgar-Apps sits with teammates during a practice at Britannia Secondary School. Photo: Jennifer Gauthier

The boys are practicing every day this week to prepare for the competition. That level of dedication doesn't surprise coach Chris McKnight, who is also Kobe's father. Many of them grew up dreaming of playing in this very tournament, he said.

“They view this event as very special because they get to play in front of their family, their friends, and the audience is going to be some of the biggest crowds they have ever played in front of.”

McKnight, Edgar, and three teammates just finished the high school basketball season, placing 6th in Double A provincials with the Britannia Bruins.

For McKnight and Edgar, it’s their last year playing at Junior All-Native, which starts at U13 and caps at U17.

“This is our last year to get it done,” said McKnight, who was recently accepted to play college basketball at Douglas College in the fall.

Kobe McKnight, a shooting guard with the Vancity Sons, practices at Britannia Secondary School. Photo: Jennifer Gauthier

But next week’s 83-team tournament is about more than just basketball – culture has always played a big role, according to organizers.

The tournament’s theme this year is unity, with the aim of promoting reconciliation throughout the province as well as within First Nations communities. There is a cultural opening ceremony as well as a family night, where community leaders offer words of encouragement to the players and invite them to dance.

It’s an opportunity for urban indigenous youth to explore their culture more, said McKnight’s father and Vancity Sons coach, Chris McKnight.

“A lot of the kids in urban areas like [Vancouver], they’re not exposed to their culture enough. So a lot of the elders will get them together to sing and dance to expose them to their culture.”

For Edgar, who grew up immersed in that culture, it’s a nostalgic experience.

“It’s a taste of home,” he said.

More than 800 B.C. youth are preparing for the province's largest youth basketball tournament and no one feels the pressure more than the 10 Vancouver boys who won the title last year.

The Vancity Sons are defending champions of the Junior All-Native Basketball Tournament. Vancouver is hosting this year's championships, which run March 18 to 23, culminating in a championship match at Capilano University. Organizers are expecting more than 5,000 spectators.

It’s an even bigger tournament than the B.C. high school provincials, which had about 60 teams competing this year.

“We are preparing for the crowd,” said 17-year-old Marlon Edgar, a shooting guard for the Vancity Sons.

“It gets pretty wild.

Coach Chris McKnight talks with the team during practice. Photo: Jennifer Gauthier

Edgar, a member of the Nuxalk First Nation, is one of hundreds of athletes who will compete for the title. Edgar moved from Bella Coola to Vancouver when he was in grade 10, specifically for the chance to play basketball at an elite level.

But the Vancity Sons were not always the powerhouse they are today. Kobe McKnight, also a shooting guard, was named MVP at last year’s championships. He recalled the team's humble beginnings in elementary school.

“We weren’t very good. We lost a lot of the games we played in,” said the Kitasoo First Nations member.  

Then, two years ago, they placed 5th at the Junior All-Native.

Last year, they won.

‍Marlon Edgar-Apps sits with teammates during a practice at Britannia Secondary School. Photo: Jennifer Gauthier

The boys are practicing every day this week to prepare for the competition. That level of dedication doesn't surprise coach Chris McKnight, who is also Kobe's father. Many of them grew up dreaming of playing in this very tournament, he said.

“They view this event as very special because they get to play in front of their family, their friends, and the audience is going to be some of the biggest crowds they have ever played in front of.”

McKnight, Edgar, and three teammates just finished the high school basketball season, placing 6th in Double A provincials with the Britannia Bruins.

For McKnight and Edgar, it’s their last year playing at Junior All-Native, which starts at U13 and caps at U17.

“This is our last year to get it done,” said McKnight, who was recently accepted to play college basketball at Douglas College in the fall.

Kobe McKnight, a shooting guard with the Vancity Sons, practices at Britannia Secondary School. Photo: Jennifer Gauthier

But next week’s 83-team tournament is about more than just basketball – culture has always played a big role, according to organizers.

The tournament’s theme this year is unity, with the aim of promoting reconciliation throughout the province as well as within First Nations communities. There is a cultural opening ceremony as well as a family night, where community leaders offer words of encouragement to the players and invite them to dance.

It’s an opportunity for urban indigenous youth to explore their culture more, said McKnight’s father and Vancity Sons coach, Chris McKnight.

“A lot of the kids in urban areas like [Vancouver], they’re not exposed to their culture enough. So a lot of the elders will get them together to sing and dance to expose them to their culture.”

For Edgar, who grew up immersed in that culture, it’s a nostalgic experience.

“It’s a taste of home,” he said.