GAME O1 - woMEN

final

Nov 22

Notre dame

81

Gonzaga

65

GAME O2 - WOMEN

final

NOV 22

rutgers

59

Drake

69

GAME O3 - WOMEN

FINAL

NOV 22

south carolina

101

etsu

55

GAME O4 - WOMEN

final

NOV 22

Oregon State

74

western kentucky

60

GAME O5 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

Gonzaga

57

rutgers

40

GAME O6 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

ETSu

67

LOSER GAME 4

82

GAME O7 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

Notre Dame

82

Drake

64

GAME O8 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

South Carolina

68

oregon state

70

GAME O9 - WOMEN

final

NOV 24

rutgers

68

etsu

44

GAME 10 - WOMEN

final

NOV 24

wku

55

gonzaga

76

GAME 11 - WOMEN

final - Championship

NOV 24

notre dame

91

oregon state

81

Final - women

final(OT) - 3rd/4th

NOV 24

drake

90

south carolina

85

Game o1 - Men

Final

Nov 18

washington

82

Santa Clara

68

GAME O2 - MEN

final

NOV 18

Texas A&M

64

Minnesota

69

GAME O3 - MEN

FINAL

NOV 20

MINNESOTA

80

Santa Clara

66

GAME O4 - MEN

8:30PM

NOV 20

washington

71

TEXAS A&M

67

GAME O5 - MEN

3:30PM

NOV 21

Minnesota

68

Washington

66

Canada

Canada Basketball to host men's Olympic basketball qualifier in Victoria 🇨🇦

GAME O1 - woMEN

final

Nov 22

Notre dame

81

Gonzaga

65

GAME O2 - WOMEN

final

NOV 22

rutgers

59

Drake

69

GAME O3 - WOMEN

FINAL

NOV 22

south carolina

101

etsu

55

GAME O4 - WOMEN

final

NOV 22

Oregon State

74

western kentucky

60

GAME O5 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

Gonzaga

57

rutgers

40

GAME O6 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

ETSu

67

LOSER GAME 4

82

GAME O7 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

Notre Dame

82

Drake

64

GAME O8 - WOMEN

final

NOV 23

South Carolina

68

oregon state

70

GAME O9 - WOMEN

final

NOV 24

rutgers

68

etsu

44

GAME 10 - WOMEN

final

NOV 24

wku

55

gonzaga

76

GAME 11 - WOMEN

final - Championship

NOV 24

notre dame

91

oregon state

81

Final - women

final(OT) - 3rd/4th

NOV 24

drake

90

south carolina

85

Game o1 - Men

Final

Nov 18

washington

82

Santa Clara

68

GAME O2 - MEN

final

NOV 18

Texas A&M

64

Minnesota

69

GAME O3 - MEN

FINAL

NOV 20

MINNESOTA

80

Santa Clara

66

GAME O4 - MEN

8:30PM

NOV 20

washington

71

TEXAS A&M

67

GAME O5 - MEN

3:30PM

NOV 21

Minnesota

68

Washington

66

Canada

Canada Basketball to host men's Olympic basketball qualifier in Victoria 🇨🇦

Canada

Canada Basketball to host men's Olympic basketball qualifier in Victoria 🇨🇦

Well, that was jarring basketball news to wake up to.

No, not that the Canadian women routed Cuba 110-53 in Edmonton last night – I bid adieu to the game after three quarters because it was one-sided and so late – but that Canada will host one of four last-chance men’s qualifying tournaments next June 23-28 in Victoria.

I’m going to try and find out later who wrote the monstrous cheque to make this happen – it’s got to be north of $5 million when you talk hosting rigbts fees and other expenses – but it’s a huge leg up for a men’s program that really needs it.

We won’t know until Nov. 27 who the other five teams are and only one will advance to the Tokyo Games and it’s going to be a crazy hard thing to do it but playing at home is a big boost.

We’ll get into who says they’ll play and who actually will show up later on but convincing players to spend maybe 10 days in Vancouver training and then a week in Victoria will be a factor of about a million easier than it would have been had they been forced to travel around the world to play.

But, as we’ve said forever, it’s going to be a next to impossible task to win the tournament even at home. They blew their best chance when all those guys bailed out of the World Cup earlier this year and the road back is long and pockmarked. Better to have it at home, though, that’s for sure. And I don’t care what any player tells me over the course of the season, I’m reserving all judgment on who’ll be on the team until their training camp actually begins.

Now, for the women.

It was an easy win as we all figured it would be and they looked really good at times with darn near the best team they could field playing.

The injury-induced absences of Miah-Marie Langlois and Kayla Alexander really are the only blight on the weekend out in Alberta which I fully expect with similarly easy triumphs tomorrow and Saturday.

But the thing to look for – and I know coach Lisa Thomaidis is looking for it more than anything – is how crisp the team look, how it pays attention to detail, how it measures up against itself.

There was a time when winning a FIBA Americas thing was a big deal, it’s still a necessary step and there is always satisfaction in winning something but this team – ranked No. 4 in the world – has to measure itself against teams like the United States, Spain, France, Australia.

Canada’s too good for the minnows of this continent but seeing as these are the last three games before the final Olympic qualification tournament in February making sure they are improving and getting comfortable with each other is the real target.

Well, that was jarring basketball news to wake up to.

No, not that the Canadian women routed Cuba 110-53 in Edmonton last night – I bid adieu to the game after three quarters because it was one-sided and so late – but that Canada will host one of four last-chance men’s qualifying tournaments next June 23-28 in Victoria.

I’m going to try and find out later who wrote the monstrous cheque to make this happen – it’s got to be north of $5 million when you talk hosting rigbts fees and other expenses – but it’s a huge leg up for a men’s program that really needs it.

We won’t know until Nov. 27 who the other five teams are and only one will advance to the Tokyo Games and it’s going to be a crazy hard thing to do it but playing at home is a big boost.

We’ll get into who says they’ll play and who actually will show up later on but convincing players to spend maybe 10 days in Vancouver training and then a week in Victoria will be a factor of about a million easier than it would have been had they been forced to travel around the world to play.

But, as we’ve said forever, it’s going to be a next to impossible task to win the tournament even at home. They blew their best chance when all those guys bailed out of the World Cup earlier this year and the road back is long and pockmarked. Better to have it at home, though, that’s for sure. And I don’t care what any player tells me over the course of the season, I’m reserving all judgment on who’ll be on the team until their training camp actually begins.

Now, for the women.

It was an easy win as we all figured it would be and they looked really good at times with darn near the best team they could field playing.

The injury-induced absences of Miah-Marie Langlois and Kayla Alexander really are the only blight on the weekend out in Alberta which I fully expect with similarly easy triumphs tomorrow and Saturday.

But the thing to look for – and I know coach Lisa Thomaidis is looking for it more than anything – is how crisp the team look, how it pays attention to detail, how it measures up against itself.

There was a time when winning a FIBA Americas thing was a big deal, it’s still a necessary step and there is always satisfaction in winning something but this team – ranked No. 4 in the world – has to measure itself against teams like the United States, Spain, France, Australia.

Canada’s too good for the minnows of this continent but seeing as these are the last three games before the final Olympic qualification tournament in February making sure they are improving and getting comfortable with each other is the real target.

Well, that was jarring basketball news to wake up to.

No, not that the Canadian women routed Cuba 110-53 in Edmonton last night – I bid adieu to the game after three quarters because it was one-sided and so late – but that Canada will host one of four last-chance men’s qualifying tournaments next June 23-28 in Victoria.

I’m going to try and find out later who wrote the monstrous cheque to make this happen – it’s got to be north of $5 million when you talk hosting rigbts fees and other expenses – but it’s a huge leg up for a men’s program that really needs it.

We won’t know until Nov. 27 who the other five teams are and only one will advance to the Tokyo Games and it’s going to be a crazy hard thing to do it but playing at home is a big boost.

We’ll get into who says they’ll play and who actually will show up later on but convincing players to spend maybe 10 days in Vancouver training and then a week in Victoria will be a factor of about a million easier than it would have been had they been forced to travel around the world to play.

But, as we’ve said forever, it’s going to be a next to impossible task to win the tournament even at home. They blew their best chance when all those guys bailed out of the World Cup earlier this year and the road back is long and pockmarked. Better to have it at home, though, that’s for sure. And I don’t care what any player tells me over the course of the season, I’m reserving all judgment on who’ll be on the team until their training camp actually begins.

Now, for the women.

It was an easy win as we all figured it would be and they looked really good at times with darn near the best team they could field playing.

The injury-induced absences of Miah-Marie Langlois and Kayla Alexander really are the only blight on the weekend out in Alberta which I fully expect with similarly easy triumphs tomorrow and Saturday.

But the thing to look for – and I know coach Lisa Thomaidis is looking for it more than anything – is how crisp the team look, how it pays attention to detail, how it measures up against itself.

There was a time when winning a FIBA Americas thing was a big deal, it’s still a necessary step and there is always satisfaction in winning something but this team – ranked No. 4 in the world – has to measure itself against teams like the United States, Spain, France, Australia.

Canada’s too good for the minnows of this continent but seeing as these are the last three games before the final Olympic qualification tournament in February making sure they are improving and getting comfortable with each other is the real target.